Free Shipping Over $49 | Easy 30 Day Return Policy

Herbs For Fire Season

August 09, 2017

Herbs For Fire Season

Pearly everlasting - a perennial in the sunflower family

 

It has been an intense fire season so far in the Northwest. Towns that rarely see smoke have been inundated. We wanted to share an herbal tea we have found helpful to manage cough, sore throat, and mild chest tightness!

 

Mullein

Mullein has a long history of helping with upper respiratory issues. It can help asthma by soothing effect the bronchioles. It soothes the respiratory tract and reduces mucus. Great for a scratchy throat from the smoke!

 

Mint

Some members of the mint family, including peppermint and spearmint, naturally contain menthol, which is the main soothing ingredient in cough drops. It clears breathing passages, and soothes inflammation. Members of the mint family are given away by their square stems.

 

Pearly Everlasting

An edible plant in the Asteracae (sunflower) family, pearly everlasting is a beautiful plant with a delicate scent. Often found in rocky, dry soil, it tolerates hard freezes. It is helpful for the lungs in similar ways to mullein.


Mint & Mullein Tea

1 tbsp dried mullein
1 tbsp mint (peppermint or spearmint)
4 cups water

Place above ingredients in a pot or teapot. Cover, and bring to a gentle boil. Immediately remove from heat and let steep, covered, for fifteen minutes (or overnight for maximum effect). Pour through a sieve, and enjoy three times a day.

Tisane vs Decoction

The correct term for the above preparation is an herbal tisane. What we call tea comes exclusively from the Camellia sinensis plant, whereas herbal "tea" can come from many plants. However, it's easier to say tea, so that's what it gets called!

A decoction on the other hand is a tisane left to sit overnight. These have twice to three times the power of an herbal tisane due to the infusion time. If you want to make your Mullein & Mint Tea extra effective, try making a decoction by following the above instructions, then letting it sit overnight.

 

 

Note: These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This post is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. If you are experiencing persistent symptoms it's best to see a qualified medical professional.



Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in News

Guest Post: Adult acne...you’re not alone
Guest Post: Adult acne...you’re not alone

January 29, 2019

Adult acne is complex and every person is different. The time of year, hormones, diet, exposure to chemicals, products, stress, exercise, etc. all contribute to the health and happiness of our skin. With so many variables, it can be REALLY tough to find just the right mix. And often it feels like as soon as I get it right, a variable changes and I’m starting from scratch.

Continue Reading

A Beginner's Guide to Foraging This Spring
A Beginner's Guide to Foraging This Spring

January 24, 2019

Spring is a time of renewal, when the cold blanket of snow, or long rains, ceases, and the light returns.

Trees, flowers, and bushes respond to the change in day length (not temperature!) and begin to come out of their long slumber. Mushrooms appear in the forests. Grass begins to grow and green again.

Continue Reading

Our favorite winter reads (and listens!)
Our favorite winter reads (and listens!)

January 16, 2019

Continue Reading